I got to interview the creator of Kill la Kill and…


Masumoto-san: Hello! Both: Pleased to meet you!
Masumoto-san: Hello! Both: Pleased to meet you! Joey: I would like to start with Masumoto-san: Yes?
Joey: I would like to start with Masumoto-san: Yes? Joey: How long has it been since the founding of TRIGGER? Masumoto-san: TRIGGER was established on August 22nd, 2011 so… that makes it 9 years since then Joey: 9 years?
so… that makes it 9 years since then Joey: 9 years? Joey: It’s been that long huh Masumoto-san: Y, yeah it has hasn’t it Both: *Laughs* Joey: I felt that it hasn’t been that long though Masumoto-san: It also felt like that for us,
we don’t really think about how many years or months but surprisingly, it’s been that long now that I think about it Joey: If we talk about your famous works, well, of course Promare, which was released last year Masumoto-san: Yes Joey: and other works like, Kill la Kill SSSS.Gridman Joey: Kiznaiver, and there are many other works of course.
Masumoto-san: Yes Which series that makes you personally feel like “This is a TRIGGER work”? Masumoto-san: Hm.. Personally I think many fans in Japan and overseas are introduced to Studio TRIGGER via Kill la Kill or in a sense that has a completely different style, Little Witch Academia Even now, it has many fans overseas Joey: Promare, that was released last year, and was premiered at Anime Expo The response during then was really amazing. Masumoto-san: Yes, it was. I’m really grateful for that
The response during then was really amazing. Masumoto-san: Yes, it was. I’m really grateful for that Joey: I was extremely excited Both: *Laughs* Joey: I also went to the cinema here in Japan, about 2 to 3 times to go watch it Masumoto-san: Thank you very much Joey: It was really amazing Joey: So, we’re here at the headquarters of Studio TRIGGER, And the animation keyframes are actually being stored here at the studio, which I was told by you
And the animation keyframes are actually being stored here at the studio, which I was told by you and that Masumoto-san has brought some here for today Masumoto-san: Yes, that’s right.
and that Masumoto-san has brought some here for today and that Masumoto-san has brought some here for today There’s a type of occupation we call the “Animator” I think there’s many people overseas who work with digital But in Japan, there’s still around 60%-80% of animators who still hand-draw Animators who draws on a paper with pencils And it’s the same in our company Promare itself was half done in CG and the other half was, as I told you before, was done using hand-drawn animation Joey: By the way, how long did it take to animate the hand-drawn part? Masumoto-san: It varies, for example, this one cut to finish this cut takes about 2-3 weeks Joey: Whoa
to finish this cut takes about 2-3 weeks Joey: Whoa Joey: One cut is quite short, isn’t it?
Joey: Whoa Joey: One cut is quite short, isn’t it? Yes, it is.
It’s around 4 seconds and most cuts were around 6 seconds Joey: *Laughs* It takes two weeks for just 6 seconds? Masumoto-san: Yes. It does takes time. Joey: That, and plus CG, right? Masumoto-san: Yes. That’s right. Joey: How long does it take to make the movie overall? Masumoto-san: If we start from the planning stages, I think it took about 5 years Joey: 5 years?!?
Masumoto-san: If we start from the planning stages, I think it took about 5 years Masumoto-san: If we start from the planning stages, I think it took about 5 years Joey: But well, the quality was wonderful,
so it’s a actually a no brainer that it’d took that long Masumoto-san: We started holding meetings for the new project planning right after we finished Kill la Kill, and it was exactly 5, 6 years ago. But we worked steadily since then until around 5 years passed since Kill la Kill Joey: So if it started from Kill la Kill, that means there were other works still being made during that time right? Masumoto-san: That’s right, that’s right. We did it at the same time.
there were other works still being made during that time right? Masumoto-san: That’s right, that’s right. We did it at the same time. Joey: Without further a due, could you show us some keyframes? Masumoto-san: Yes of course
Joey: Without further a due, could you show us some keyframes? Joey: Without further a due, could you show us some keyframes? Joey: This is really a precious moment ladies & gentlemen Joey: Some really precious footage right here Masumoto-san: This is pretty much the planned track number frame, the layout Masumoto-san: It flows from this cut like this This is what we called layout
Masumoto-san: It flows from this cut like this This is what we called layout Well, it’s something like a blueprint Joey: I see
Well, it’s something like a blueprint Joey: I see Masumoto-san: And we have to put in here movements,
characters will be moving a lot
Joey: I see Masumoto-san: And we have to put in here movements,
characters will be moving a lot the hand-drawn key animators have to draw it up page by page
the hand-drawn key animators have to draw it up page by page Masumoto-san: Please take a look Joey: Oh, can I? Masumoto-san: From the bottom to the top Joey: Wow, just touching it makes me nervous Wow it’s so amazing Masumoto-san: This is the protagonist, Galo doing his signature pose Joey: Yes
Masumoto-san: this is the scene when his name comes out Joey: Ooh Masumoto-san: That cut was 4.12 seconds Both: *Laughs* Joey: I see that there’s multiple colors of paper like white, yellow and green Is there any meaning behind this? Masumoto-san: Yes. The white paper at the bottom is
the first one to be drawn by the animator Joey: I see
Masumoto-san: After that, we have Sushio-san, the Animation Director who gives us direction with the drawings He also draws, and his drawing is the one on the yellow paper Joey: I see, I see
Masumoto-san: This is something like a revision for the animator’s drawing Masumoto-san: On top of that page, there’s the green paper The page after it is where director’s check starts This yellow paper is Sushio-san’s drawing And that green paper is, as I said earlier, Director Imaishi Joey: *Laughs* This is so amazing I really like both Director Imaishi and Sushio-san Masumoto-san: Thank you!
I really like both Director Imaishi and Sushio-san Masumoto-san: Thank you! Joey: And the fact that all of it is here, somehow makes me so nervous
Masumoto-san: Thank you! Joey: And the fact that all of it is here, somehow makes me so nervous Joey: Regarding Promare’s success story when it was premiered at Anime Expo To me, I thought it was probably an opportunity for people from overseas to recognize Promare and TRIGGER,
people from overseas to recognize Promare and TRIGGER, To you, Masumoto-san who has been working
in this industry for quite some time How important do you think about the overseas influence has towards the Anime industry? Masumoto-san: I should say that the fans enthusiasm has a great impression Like when they saw our work and expressed how they like it how should I say it, the aggressiveness is a little different with Japanese fans To make it easier, approaches like cosplaying or going to events felt like their appreciation towards the creators is so great And expressing it in such a great way makes us very happy in a way Masumoto: Nowadays, anime is aired not only in Japan but also aired at the same time world-wide through multiple streaming platforms overseas fans reactions are expressed very actively
but also aired at the same time world-wide through multiple streaming platforms overseas fans reactions are expressed very actively And I think that kind of thing is a great source of
emotional support for creators in Japan Joey: There’s a variety of anime companies here in Japan, and I don’t know if this is unique to your company, but the way TRIGGER accepts the enthusiasm from overseas fans
and I don’t know if this is unique to your company, but the way TRIGGER accepts the enthusiasm from overseas fans is kind of different right? I mean like you have a Patreon, and you have the Live Drawings sessions on your Twitch channel as well I think only TRIGGER that does that, right? Masumoto-san: Yes, I think so.
I think only TRIGGER that does that, right? I think only TRIGGER that does that, right? And by doing that, it also shows your appreciation
towards the international fans Masumoto-san: Yes, that’s right
And by doing that, it also shows your appreciation
towards the international fans Masumoto-san: Yes, that’s right Masumoto-san: Our company originally came from a company called Gainax and founded our company from there Ever since then, it is thanks to the fans that we were able
to put our all in making anime and it’s always been like that here in our company We wanted to increase the chances to meet our fans as much as possible We also did quite a lot of events here in Japan And fortunately, we also have someone in our staff
who does Overseas Business Management After the founding of TRIGGER, we began to go to overseas events relatively about 5-6,10 times within a year We’re trying to increase the opportunity where we can directly meet with our international viewers and convey our gratitude Even by doing so, we can only meet them where the event is being held Joey: Well, that’s true. Masumoto-san: So with the use of these networks, we can widen our connection with our viewers,
Joey: Well, that’s true. Masumoto-san: So with the use of these networks, we can widen our connection with our viewers, and can increase opportunities to talk more to fans regarding latest updates and such Joey: Do you recommend other anime companies to do something similar to what you’re doing? Like saying, “You should do this!”? Masumoto-san: I don’t actually. When we did Little Witch Academia We did it with the Kickstarter project, the person who’s in charge of international relations who brought up the idea. If you think about it, we’re a company who likes to try and do new stuff first Joey: I see
If you think about it, we’re a company who likes to try and do new stuff first Joey: I see So we thought of various ways so that we can connect with our overseas fans and there were many of our staff members who gave out ideas It’s not like we planned it from the beginning, but that’s how we decided to do it So, there’s a chance that it it would turn out well and, on the contrary there’s a chance it would not. That’s why I can’t really reccomend it to other companies Joey: But from an overseas fan’s perspective, I think even only having the guts to try it out is splendid in it’s own way Japan’s anime industry is, from an overseas fan’s point of view, there’s still like a wall in between or should I say a gap? Joey: Their awareness of overseas fans is still small for now Masumoto-san: That’s right
Joey: Their awareness of overseas fans is still small for now Joey: Their awareness of overseas fans is still small for now Masumoto-san: This is very typical of Japanese,
we, as the people who make animation the creative department and people who do management actually don’t get much opportunities to come in contact with the viewers Just by working daily on animation When we made Gurren Lagann,
there’s a platform called Niconico Douga in Japan There’s a tool where you can put your comment in the videos, and for the first time we realized that “There are fans who watch our work!” To be honest, if you ask the question of “Who do we work for?” We work for the sake of our client, right? Joey: I see Masumoto-san: But it’s not like that, because in the end there are our fans And the first work that made us aware of that is “Gurren Lagann” And from then on we try to make constant contact with our fans to some extent With that, we do our work with our policy and keep increasing our experience. That’s our story up until now. It has a pleasant feeling, doesn’t it? Joey: That’s true. Masumoto-san: Really
Joey: That’s true. Masumoto-san: Really Joey: I’m also doing YouTube, and if there’s no comments section It really makes me feels like not wanting to make videos anymore When I saw the comments, directly from the people who watch the video something like “This is good!” or… “This is kind of…” receiving those kind of feedbacks helps me grow as a creator, I think. Masumoto-san: Yes it does. Masumoto-san: When one of our works starts showing in cinemas and the first thing that gets evaluated is the director, right? Therefore, just a single animator is not featured in just one movie when we watch the video and the comment comes out, and the timing is exactly at the scene that we made it feels like we’re the one that’s getting appreciated Joey: That’s right If you think to that detail, Every staff receiving a comment from the viewers Makes us really happy Masumoto-san: The other protagonist, the character named Lio Joey: The one that’s super popular among the ladies, right? Masumoto-san: *Laughs* Joey: This is obvious, but my head unconsciously says “Wow it’s exactly the same with the movie” Both: *Laughs* Joey: Even though this is the movie itself About the character design,
Masumoto-san: Yes? Joey: Promare, and as well as other TRIGGER works has their own uniqueness compared to other anime Joey: Does the concept normally comes from just one person or it is decided by the company? Masumoto-san: Hmm.. We have a company that we admire, And it’s PIXAR
Joey: Ooh In the past it was Miyazaki-san, Miyazaki Hayao-san We also admired him. The planning meeting, the first production uh, project meeting, takes around 1-3 years during that time, there is a Scriptwriter, or in other words, Scenario Writer present also the Director is present And actually the staff that draws is there as well so from every steps of the scenario we have the drawing staff to participate and, as the scenario progressed, we try decide on what kind of drawing or what kind of character. We’re doing it side by side at the same time designing the character together as the scenario progress Joey: So you did everything in one go?
designing the character together as the scenario progress Joey: So you did everything in one go? Masumoto-san: That’s right. And of course, this is actually a very inefficient way to do it Joey: Is that so? Masumoto-san: Yes. If you only think about keeping up with the schedule, doing it separately is much more efficient. Like after you finished the scenario,
Masumoto-san: Yes. If you only think about keeping up with the schedule, doing it separately is much more efficient. Like after you finished the scenario, Then ask the drawing staff to make a character like this. Because if the scenario changes, the character also changes. To make this anime which took about 5 years, and during that time the image of a character is also changing so the longer it takes to make the movie, the more the world trends tend to change and we have to go along with the times and trends
Joey: You have to go along with the times and the trends Joey: Did the characters in Promare also had any design changes? Masumoto-san: Well it took us 3 years so *Laughs*
had any design changes? Masumoto-san: Well it took us 3 years so *Laughs* You can’t even say it only changed Joey: So like, Lio too, is totally different from the beginning? Masumoto-san: Yes.
Joey: So like, Lio too, is totally different from the beginning? Masumoto-san: Yes. Joey: I see. Well, I really can’t draw, but
Masumoto-san: Yes. Joey: I see. Well, I really can’t draw, but to be able to draw this beautifully and skilfully and even the spaces in between is also very clean How long does the training or how long would it take to get good at these? Masumoto-san: Let’s see. It’s not as simple as the ability to draw good drawings, but things like acting and spacing would be different drawing work from an illustrator’s job the finalization to make a clean scene of a moving picture takes about 1-3 years to master this work
the finalization to make a clean scene of a moving picture takes about 1-3 years to master this work Joey: I see After passing through all that, they’ll start drawing the key animation here, in which we call an animator Joey: Oh, so this one is the beginning?
Masumoto-san: Yes, that’s right Joey: So how long does it takes to master key animation? Masumoto-san: Well, it never ends Joey: So there’s someone who’s just been doing key animations? Masumoto-san: Well, the person who likes anime, or rather, a “Super Animator” who can make a really clean frame of key animation,
of course on top of having talent as their base it’s honestly not about how many years it takes. Joey: Well, then, changing the topic,
Masumoto-san: Yes Joey: I think the overseas viewers, or should I say, the anime lovers who are watching this video about the inside, or rather the truth behind this industry I don’t think they’re quite aware about it, right? Masumoto-san: I don’t think so Joey: Of course, it’s probably a secret in the industry
Masumoto-san: I don’t think so Joey: Of course, it’s probably a secret in the industry like industrial secret and many other things For example, in what way can someone become an Anime Producer? or by what method can someone enter this industry? I think there’s not a lot of talks regarding this topic So frankly speaking, can you tell us about your history in this industry, about how you entered this industry, is what I’d like to ask
So frankly speaking, can you tell us about your history in this industry, about how you entered this industry, is what I’d like to ask Masumoto-san: So, I’m turning 44 years old this year, the reason I was aiming to work for this industry is probably the same as everyone else I just simply like anime When I was 13 or 14, there was a movie called “Nadia: The Secret of Blue Water” I was really surprised by this work And at the time, it really made me curious about who made this anime And became aware of Director Anno Hideaki’s existence, I’m not sure if you know about him then I remember the animator staff’s names and other various names. Japan at that time, just by saying “I watch anime” will make you being left out in the corner of the class Masumoto-san: *Laughs*
Joey: Ooh.. I get it
will make you being left out in the corner of the class Masumoto-san: *Laughs*
Joey: Ooh.. I get it When I was in high school, I never told anyone that I watch anime Even though I always watched anime like Sailor Moon,
When I was in high school, I never told anyone that I watch anime Even though I always watched anime like Sailor Moon, and Case Closed, and others Masumoto-san: At the time, I didn’t have any intention to enter this industry But when I went to university, during my first year, I was 18 at the time, An anime called “Neon Genesis Evangelion” was aired during that time.
Joey: Yes, yes And it surprised me again, and it made
me think that anime has different genres
An anime called “Neon Genesis Evangelion” was aired during that time.
Joey: Yes, yes And it surprised me again, and it made
me think that anime has different genres I thought this work is one layer above as a piece of entertainment, it was what I thought of it at the time. And just when I wonder who made this masterpiece, It was the same person who made “Nadia: The Secret of Blue Sea” by knowing this, built my desire to want to create anime, not just watching it To be honest, at first I studied drawing endlessly to become an animator Joey: Oh, is that so?
Masumoto-san: Yes Masumoto-san: Yes, I did. But it was quite hard to be good enough to work as an animator. Masumoto-san: In the year of 2000 I began to work in the anime industry During that time it was called a “Production Assistant”, which is In addition to making animation there’s also management which is very important in making animation
During that time it was called a “Production Assistant”, which is In addition to making animation there’s also management which is very important in making animation Like managing schedules, finding new staff, staff care management and to properly circulate all of the materials here, which is called material management There’s a professional type of occupation for a job like that Joey: Is that when you were in Gainax? Masumoto-san: Oh, no, actually when I first entered this industry I worked at a very small company My first work that was aired was “Hajime no Ippo” Joey: Is that so? Masumoto-san: Yes
After that I took part in one of Toei Animation’s production, “Digimon Adventure” Ah, but the one that I took part in was “Digimon Tamers” and “Digimon Frontier”
Joey: I see Masumoto-san: and there’s “Magical DoReMi”, and after that, around the year of 2007 It was by luck and was able to get in to Gainax Joey: Does that kind of work have a recruiting advertisement like normal part-time jobs?? Masumoto-san: Yes, usually there are something like “we are recruiting for this type of occupation” in schools, or in part-time job information magazines Joey: Is that so?
in schools, or in part-time job information magazines Masumoto-san: Yes
Joey: Is that so?
Joey: Is that so?
in schools, or in part-time job information magazines in schools, or in part-time job information magazines
Masumoto-san: Yes
Joey: Is that so? Masumoto-san: Yes
Joey: Is that so? Masumoto-san: Yes
Joey: Wait in magazines? Wow Masumoto-san: Well, it was 20 years ago. And at that time, we were told that it was a job that anyone can do when it comes to drawing, like professional animators, it can’t be done without drawing skills Masumoto-san: It is a special job But for management, you can do it as long as you can speak, drive a car, and carry things Joey: Ah I see, I see
But for management, you can do it as long as you can speak, drive a car, and carry things I was told it was that kind of job back then
Joey: Ah I see, I see Joey: Ah I see, I see Masumoto-san: “Wow, this is wonderful” I thought, as I sign up
Joey: *Laughs* Joey: How did it end up making TRIGGER from Gainax? Masumoto-san: First when I got in to Gainax, the first work that I was given to was “Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann” I did it until the very end, after that I was promoted
from Episode Director to Project Manager Well, it was really difficult, I even thought I was going to be killed *laughs* Joey: I get that *laughs*
Well, it was really difficult, I even thought I was going to be killed *laughs* Well, it was really difficult, I even thought I was going to be killed *laughs* Masumoto-san: But actually, during that time I was able to meet Director Imaishi Joey: I see Masumoto-san: and then our company, TRIGGER’s president, Ootsuka Masahiko The next title that was given to me was “Panty & Stocking with Garterbelt” At that time, there was an election of some sorts, and I was the one appointed to be the Animation Producer. This time, not only about the visuals, but I also had a hand in the business side of things as well. Joey: I watched Panty & Stocking back in the day I want to ask your personal opinion about this I personally don’t prefer English dubbing Masumoto-san: I heard that there are people overseas like that Joey: Yes, that’s right
Masumoto-san: I heard that there are people overseas like that Masumoto-san: I heard that there are people overseas like that Among all sorts of English dubbed anime,
the one anime that made me think “Wow! This is great!” was “Panty & Stocking” Masumoto-san: Oh really? Masumoto-san: I don’t understand English, but I thought it was pretty amazing at the time In my opinion, “Panty & Stocking”‘s visual is kind of far from anime Masumoto-san: Cartoon Joey: Yes, it’s very cartoon-ish, right? Maybe because of that the English dubbing doesn’t seem out of place I mean, of course, the voice actors also did a great job The Japanese version is also great, but when asked about which anime has good English dub, I’d always recommend, “Panty & Stocking” Masumoto-san: Ooh thank you Joey: I just wanted to tell you that *laughs*
Masumoto-san: Ooh thank you Joey: I just wanted to tell you that *laughs* Matsumoto-san: Even so I’m grateful it was a work from 2010, so it’s a work from 10 years ago
Matsumoto-san: Even so I’m grateful it was a work from 2010, so it’s a work from 10 years ago Joey: Wow, it’s been 10 years?
it was a work from 2010, so it’s a work from 10 years ago it was a work from 2010, so it’s a work from 10 years ago At the time, it was rather unique among other anime series in Japan We really had no idea how our viewers will take it If it were called a cartoon, they would understand. But at the time in Japan, cartoon culture wasn’t that popular Joey: That’s right
If it were called a cartoon, they would understand. But at the time in Japan, cartoon culture wasn’t that popular Joey: That’s right Masumoto-san: Business Developement comes first in Japanese animation
Joey: That’s right Masumoto-san: Business Developement comes first in Japanese animation not after it gets published, but before it
gets published they try to plan it thoroughly So we don’t really know how the business developement goes Masumoto-san: We were like “What should we do??” Joey: That’s certainly quite risky if you ask me Masumoto-san: The work was entirely directed by Director Imaishi
Joey: That’s certainly quite risky if you ask me Masumoto-san: The work was entirely directed by Director Imaishi in each episode, we gather many people with various type of characteristics for example, Yamamoto Sayo-san, the director of “Yuri!!! on Ice” and Kobayashi Osamu-san, the director of “BECK” And we ask them directly “Please make a story like this” and we just toss it up to them Joey: No way
Masumoto-san: *Laughs*
and we just toss it up to them and we just toss it up to them Masumoto-san: And in the end, the image didn’t change that much with each directors. So this work is widely acceptable Joey: Certainly, anything goes in this anime
Masumoto-san: Anything goes, right? During that time, in Japan there was a taboo, well it’s not as bad as taboo, but we couldn’t touch this topic much it how to portray “erotic” stuff And how far can we use it for entertainment was a challenge for us Joey: If I’m not wrong, in the English dubbed version, It was famous for the racy one liners, right Masumoto-san:*Laughs* Yes. Joey: I was like “Wow, you’re going that far?” Masumoto-san: We wanted to challenge ourselves with anime, which is an entertainment to please our viewers. In that aspect, we don’t know what would happen, because it was a challenge But business in anime industry nowadays takes too much challenges, and in the end doesn’t know what is going to happen *laughs* When it was released, we got recognition because it was new and interesting Even now, our overseas viewers often ask us “When will you make the second season of Panty & Stocking” *laughs* Joey: That’s right
“When will you make the second season of Panty & Stocking” *laughs* Joey: That’s right Joey: Personally, do you want to make a second season? Masumoto-san: Well, I would like to do it if there was a chance On one side, there’s the fans but on the other side, well, Japanese animation is a business, so, as long as the business aspect is not certain, we can’t say for sure Joey: In our talks about TRIGGER earlier, if we talk about the most outstanding work within the anime industry since TRIGGER was founded, it has to be Kill la Kill, right? Masumoto-san: Yes, absolutely
it has to be Kill la Kill, right? Masumoto-san: Yes, absolutely Joey: And since you also bought the key animation of Kill la Kill… Masumoto-san: Oh, yes
Joey: And since you also bought the key animation of Kill la Kill… Joey: And since you also bought the key animation of Kill la Kill… Masumoto-san: This is the key animation of the protagonist, Ryuko Joey: Woow amazing it’s so nostalgic, it’s weird to say that, but it really feels nostalgic Joey: At the time when Kill la Kill first came out It became super populer overseas Masumoto-san: I’d like to ask you a question, what kind of anime was it from your eyes? Joey: Well, it depends on how your point of view about anime Joey: Like, is it just for entertainment, or as an artwork Masumoto-san: I see, as an artwork
Joey: Like, is it just for entertainment, or as an artwork Masumoto-san: I see, as an artwork Joey: Like if we saw it as the work of art, it would be very different, Especially, Kill la Kill is like right in the middle Masumoto-san: I see Joey: So the person who saw it as a piece of entertainment, thought it was interesting and the person who saw it as a work of art thought “There’s a deep meaning behind this” and it became a popular topic at the time Like, the true story behind Kill la Kill,
and the person who saw it as a work of art thought “There’s a deep meaning behind this” and it became a popular topic at the time Like, the true story behind Kill la Kill, or like the school system represents something deep or stuff like that there’s a lot of theory like this going around Masumoto-san: Well the concept of the story, we aimed it to be like the Weekly Shounen JUMP magazine Where the story is continuous every single week and we try to end
the episodes with a cliffhanger Can’t wait for that next episode, there’s that one week time lag to make them really want to watch the next episode the following week. In animation, as long as there’s many people involved It’s an obvious theory to end a 30 minute show just at the right timing A way of getting the viewers to watch it again the following week And in that one episode, we had to jam a lot of stuff, plus we had to make it so that the viewers will want to watch the next episode the following week. so it was quite different from the very first concept Joey: The pacing was indeed fast Masumoto-san: Yes, it’s quite fast
Joey: The pacing was indeed fast Masumoto-san: Yes, it’s quite fast Joey: There is also an opinion, that even the people who keep watching it over and over again and still found something new Joey: By the way, when you made Promare, you mentioned it took about 5 years? Masumoto-san: Yes, that’s right
Joey: By the way, when you made Promare, you mentioned it took about 5 years? Joey: By the way, when you made Promare, you mentioned it took about 5 years? Joey: How long did it take to make Kill la Kill? Masumoto-san: When “Panty & Stocking” ended on December 25th, 2010. It ended on Christmas Day. Masumoto-san: And right after that, we held a production meeting, on the start of 2011 Masumoto-san: So that makes it 1, 2, 3 about 3-4 years, I think
Joey: 3 years? Joey: I see, so the movie took longer to make? Masumoto-san: Yes, it did. Joey: Promare is about 2 hours, right? Masumoto-san: Yes, that’s right
Joey: Promare is about 2 hours, right? Masumoto-san: Yes, that’s right Joey: It’s a 2 hour movie, so if we compare it with Kill la Kill, it takes about 6 times longer? Masumoto: Yes, that’s right
Joey: It’s a 2 hour movie, so if we compare it with Kill la Kill, it takes about 6 times longer? Joey: It’s a 2 hour movie, so if we compare it with Kill la Kill, it takes about 6 times longer? Joey: If we did the math, I thought Kill la Kill would be the one that takes more time Joey: Is there any reason why Kill la Kill took less time to make than Promare did? Masumoto-san: It’s because the logic of making a series and a movie is completely different Doing a TV series means to work on how to connect each episode like, after the first episode, comes the second, after the second, comes the third and the making of the story is, I wouldn’t say more simple, but in a sense, it is easier to make The information in Kill la Kill felt quite compressed, right? Masumoto-san: Promare also feels like it’s… too compressed, right? Joey: *Laughs* Right
Masumoto-san: Promare also feels like it’s… too compressed, right? Joey: *Laughs* Right Masumoto-san: The most difficult thing about making a movie is to figure out how to deliver it within 2 hours We wanted not only our viewer to see it as interesting, but we also wanted to throw something to them We wanted to convey, for example the situation during that time period, or something about the theme So, on top of having a theme, we expressed it with animation, and on top of that there’s entertainment and even on top of that, we wanted to deliver something as a souvenir for our viewer And to deliver that all in 2 hours… Our company is quite bad at that
Both: *Laughs* Masumoto-san: That’s why, in many ways, it took quite some time. Joey: What do you think is Kill la Kill’s charm, if I may so ask? Masumoto-san: I think the story’s pattern is actually simple After TRIGGER was founded, it was like that with Kill la Kill and Promare, there was a lot of people and animators who are involved in many works then, I got the feeling that animator is a work with a lot of freedom It’s not an easy job. But, there are people who does it for a living, And there are who draws with passion in each work and we have a lot of passionate creators who are staff in our company
And there are who draws with passion in each work and we have a lot of passionate creators who are staff in our company even though it has a simple story, but to make our viewers enjoy our work we try to add a lot of passion, with each cut but that takes a lot of time Joey: I get it. Somehow, when I watch each episode
but that takes a lot of time Joey: I get it. Somehow, when I watch each episode I felt the overflowing energy Masumoto-san: That’s right
I felt the overflowing energy Masumoto-san: That’s right Joey: Somehow just by watching it it feels like I’m doing a workout I think this is a work that greatly conveys their burning passion I think all of TRIGGER’s works are like that,
they really convey their passion with their work Masumoto-san: There’s a bunch of anime being made at the moment you see, it’s difficult to focus on one job because there are a lot of works and above all to compress all your skill and effort with that timing and do every work with passion on top of that And Kill la Kill is an anime that can only be made by the staff, during that time Joey: I see Masumoto-san: So it’s not something that can be easily reproduced again
Joey: I see Masumoto-san: So it’s not something that can be easily reproduced again and here we have Ryuko’s partner’s character Mako, Mankanshoku Mako Joey: I really like this character
Mako, Mankanshoku Mako Joey: I really like this character I understand this from looking at these key animations Only the character is drawn here, right And I do believe that creating the background art is another job Joey: Does TRIGGER have their own background style? Matsumoto-san: You see, a person who works at Disney said that 60% of the impression and information from a scene is given by the background Of course, the one that viewers look at is the character but, the one who controls their impression is the background so the purpose of a background is really big so character wont stand out if we remove the background Joey: Yes I agree
so character wont stand out if we remove the background Kill la Kill’s school setting is far from normal, right?
Masumoto-san: Yes, that’s right
so character wont stand out if we remove the background Kill la Kill’s school setting is far from normal, right?
Masumoto-san: Yes, that’s right Joey: That alone leaves quite the impression Masumoto-san: Yes. You see, 80% of Japanese anime is an adaptation like from manga, novel, or games, and our company relatively does more original works Masumoto-san: We ourselves try to think up of how the world and the characters look like and make an anime out of it, those are what we call original works Joey: Is all of TRIGGER’s works are original? Masumoto-san: Not all, but about 80% are original works Joey: For example… Oh”SSSS.Gridman” is one of your adaptation works
Masumoto-san: Not all, but about 80% are original works Joey: For example… Oh”SSSS.Gridman” is one of your adaptation works Masumoto-san: Yes, SSSS.Gridman is an adaptation, and others like, Ninja Slayer
Joey: For example… Oh”SSSS.Gridman” is one of your adaptation works Masumoto-san: Yes, SSSS.Gridman is an adaptation, and others like, Ninja Slayer Joey: Making an anime adaptation is quite hard if you ask me Masumoto-san: Yes, it is
Joey: Making an anime adaptation is quite hard if you ask me Masumoto-san: Yes, it is Joey: As you said earlier, most of Japanese animation about 80% are adapted from works that are already out there, Is there a reason why, TRIGGER tries to make original works instead of doing adaptations? Masumoto-san: Making an anime adaptation is definitely not bad, it’s wonderful but but because it is an adaptation, the image is already there and it’s not that fun to do for our staffs As a company, it’s quite fun to think about something that’s not yet out there Joey: I see
As a company, it’s quite fun to think about something that’s not yet out there Joey: I see Masumoto-san: That’s why we wanted to do it as much as possible Joey: I think because of that TRIGGER is well known among people from overseas Masumoto-san: Thank you so much
among people from overseas Masumoto-san: Thank you so much Joey: Oh, what is this again? Kill la Kill’s background? Masumoto-san: Background
Joey: Oh, what is this again? Kill la Kill’s background? Joey: Oh, what is this again? Kill la Kill’s background? Joey: Wow this is nice It’s so cool Is this also hand-drawn? Masumoto-san: Yes We draw most of it, around 90%-100%
Masumoto-san: Yes We draw most of it, around 90%-100% Digitally, like with Photoshop Joey: I see
Digitally, like with Photoshop Digitally, like with Photoshop Masumoto-san: There are also times when we want something like this so the person in charge gives it their all and makes the background art Joey: So to draw background illustrations is a different kind of job from an animator or illustrator, right? Masumoto-san: Yes. It’s a different section
is a different kind of job from an animator or illustrator, right? Masumoto-san: Yes. It’s a different section and of course they are all specialists at what they do Joey: We talked about how an animator takes around 1-3 years of training,
so how about background? Masumoto-san: The person in charge said that to be able to materialize it to something like this takes around 3 years
Masumoto-san: The person in charge said that to be able to materialize it to something like this takes around 3 years Joey: 3 years?
to materialize it to something like this takes around 3 years to materialize it to something like this takes around 3 years Joey: It’s been 9 years, it’s almost the 10th anniversary of TRIGGER, right? Masumoto-san: Yes, next year is our 10th anniversary
Joey: It’s been 9 years, it’s almost the 10th anniversary of TRIGGER, right? Joey: It’s been 9 years, it’s almost the 10th anniversary of TRIGGER, right? Joey: This video is planned to be uploaded next month, and next month is also when TRIGGER’s new series is getting released, right? Masumoto-san: The anime is titled “BNA: Brand New Animal” this is too, an original work of TRIGGER But I can’t talk much about the content, though Joey: Yes, of course
But I can’t talk much about the content, though Masumoto-san: It was decided that it will also be airing on Netflix. Of course, in Japan too.
Joey: Yes, of course
But I can’t talk much about the content, though But I can’t talk much about the content, though
Masumoto-san: It was decided that it will also be airing on Netflix. Of course, in Japan too. Masumoto-san: It was decided that it will also be airing on Netflix. Of course, in Japan too. So I’d like everyone to take a look at it Joey: Is there anything particular you’d like us to see? Masumoto-san: Let’s see. As I told you before, there are not a lot of Japanese Animation that expresses eroticness, and as I said earlier, we like challenge and BNA is another challenge and another new approach for us We tried a new approach with the story and we asked a designer from overseas to help us out with the visuals We are aggressively aiming to bring our work to the next level That was the concept too, so we are again challenging ourselves with this new work Joey: I see… So, BNA starts in… April?
That was the concept too, so we are again challenging ourselves with this new work Joey: I see… So, BNA starts in… April? Masumoto-san: Yes, April Joey: BNA starts in April, so please have a look We talked about a lot of things about TRIGGER. And there is one last thing I think most of the viewers here in this video are overseas people and are also TRIGGER fans, including me So can you give us a few words, to the fans?
are overseas people and are also TRIGGER fans, including me So can you give us a few words, to the fans? Masumoto-san: Let’s see… Well I think there are people who have watched our works there are also people who haven’t watched any I would be grateful if you try to at least watch one of them So far, TRIGGER has made a lot of works,
from now on too we are planning to make some more and there’s a lot of chance for us to communicate, through those works, so please do leave comments regarding our works, or come over to the events that we’re going to,
it would make us really happy if you do that Joey: There you have it folks. Thank you so much for sharing your precious time today.
or come over to the events that we’re going to,
it would make us really happy if you do that Joey: There you have it folks. Thank you so much for sharing your precious time today. Masumoto-san: The pleasure is mine
Joey: There you have it folks. Thank you so much for sharing your precious time today. Masumoto-san: The pleasure is mine And this concludes my interview with Masumoto Kazuya from TRIGGER

100 Replies to “I got to interview the creator of Kill la Kill and…”

  1. I don't even watch anime anymore but Kill la Kill was the first anime I ever saw and I was sooo confused lmao
    Why is everyone naked? Why is everyone shouting? But by the end, I was totally in love with the sisters. Such a weird way to tell a story about finding your family, and that's probably why I never forgot about it.

  2. You heard from him
    People who got rejected can flex to the whole class room by becoming the co-producer of an anime studio 😆

  3. It's really damn cool, and I have a huge respect for this demi god of art and fiction who walks amongst us mere mortals… But I'm just here admiring the two statues in the back depicting some of the latest additions to the thousands-strong pantheon of goddesses of Thighdeology.

  4. Joes release the rest of the video please! Honestly your interviews are always extremely well done! Really appreciate that.

  5. it's really awesome to see someone who is passionatd about what they do that you don't really understand

    awesome vid, joey

  6. Everyone around world panicking because of CORONA virus
    Joey is chilling and interview ing people …😊

  7. Welp. You know it's bad when you watch the first 2 minutes of the video and don't realize you have no subtitles. Yet you understand it all. Lol.
    9:29. I can relate to this lol. The difference is, I sometimes quit, and other times don't.

  8. Wow, this is unreal. What an awesome opportunity. Thanks for sharing this! Also thank you to the translators too! 😍😍😍

  9. Sacadle, Promare didn't air here in Mexico (at least not in my city) but hopefully I'll be able to watch it soon. 🙂

  10. Omg. It's been a while I met him in Comic Fiesta 2017/18 in Malaysia. And I'm just a fanboy got 2 of his autograph and a selfie 😍

  11. you can already feel he´s a badass for not hiding his face, only a MAN would come up with Ryuko as a protagonist

  12. The Grin I had on my face when I read the title I could not believe it I just paused the video and stared in to the abyss for about 5 minutes then I came to my self and continued on.

  13. While people keep talking bout Kill la Kill and Guren Lagann

    The anime that make me really into this studio was Little Witch Academia

    Man that show is so underrated its make me so damn sad

  14. For some reason the shirt reminds me of the female character from the Fredo and Pidjin art. Long nose beak

  15. I know this has nothing to do with the anime but i remember you said you started to watch ATLA so I was wondering if you'll make a video about it?

  16. 2 weeks for 4-6 seconds. Dang. But with advances in AI, I bet that'll come down. I don't think anyone really expected such broad uses of AI, but now that there is an AI that can create 60fps interpolation in videos, I'm expecting that sort of tech to come to this industry in the next few years.

    P.S. Those wondering about a Patreon alternative (due to Patreon coming against anime), there's one called SubscribeStar. I know of at least one project already moving there.

  17. This was so entertaining! Kill la Kill is my favourite anime of all time and it was so cool to see all the behind the scenes stuff! 🙂

  18. learn a lot about TRIGGER, thanks for the informative interview anime-man. Realizing the same studio creating gurren lagann and kill la kill just now. No wonder the art looks familiar.

  19. as a hardcore Trigger fan I enjoyed the heck out of this it looked long but watching it seems not that long at all good times great interview

  20. Excellent interview Joey! I hope you’re having a great day and try not to be around a lot of people during this virus. Always wash your hands and wear a mask outside! That includes you, whoever reads this. Have a great day! 😘😘😘

  21. Joey, thank you for all the interviews you do. I've watched pretty much all of them and always thoroughly enjoy hearing about the people behind the anime and manga I love.

  22. love you joey, hope ur fine during this pandemic, also thnks for keeping me entertained during this crappy period .

  23. What was the studio who made new hellsing?? (not new but… my english is bad forgive me)
    Also I don't mind if joey upload the uncut version of this interview I will watch it until the end
    And btw
    What a coincidence!
    He said hajime no ippo when I was watching it hahhahaah

  24. 6:25 – hears "Patreon…."
    Smashes pause button, skid-runs over to Patreon, enters 'trigger'; enrolls!
    Gasps for air… "HOW DID I NOT KNOW ABOUT THIS SOONER!?!" o.0
    Well, I am very glad you guys give us fans the option to appreciate you!!!
    I honestly wish more animators and studios would do that! So many of them still work below the poverty line and that is just not necessary when the Market is this big! 0.0
    @studio Trigger: Thank you for all your amazing work!!!!!!

  25. What’s ur opinion on Banana Fish? I’ve been wanting to watch it but can’t find a solid review on it. TwT

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